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Here Are 6 Types of Child Care Patterns, Which Mums Choose?

If you already have children and get along with other families, Mums will learn one thing quickly: that every parent and child’s relationship is unique. Although each family can be different, experts identify some of the most common parenting styles or parenting patterns.

Each of these parenting patterns is distinguished by the support provided by the parents and how much control the parents place on the child. Each of these foster care patterns has their own advantages and disadvantages, although some types of foster care patterns are considered more beneficial for the child. So, what are the types of foster care patterns? Here’s an explanation!

6 Types of Parenting Patterns Mums Need to Know

Here are 6 types of parenting patterns mums need to know:

1. Authoritarian Parenting Patterns

What it means

This is a strict parenting approach. Parents set high expectations and strict rules without giving the child enough support or asking for their opinions. Authoritarian parents believe that a child should do what they say. If the child does not follow the rules, there will be a penalty given. The goal of authoritarian foster care is obedience.

How it is implemented

Authoritarian parents may not be able to set strict rules on their children if they are young. However, they usually make a rigid eating and sleep schedule. When the child is 3-6 years old, authoritarian parents may set a strict schedule of meal times, potty training, bedtime, and set harsh penalties if the child is fussy. Real examples such as forcing a child to eat even if he says he is full.

The impact on children

Teaching children to respect the rules is actually good. Because the parenting pattern is strict, the child tends to think first before doing something, so he tends not to make impulsive choices. However, research shows that a strict and harsh approach can put pressure on children to be perfect, as well as make them vulnerable to behaviors such as being quiet, lonely, or fearful.

2. Authoritative Foster Care Patterns

What it means

Authoritative parents aim to strike a balance between being strict but also warm and supporting the child. Instead of forcing children to follow the rules, authoritative parents will invite children to discuss rules and expectations. However, they set out clearly about their respective duties and would punish the child if he did not do what he was supposed to do. Authoritative foster care patterns apply discipline in the form of teaching and educating, as well as establishing reasonable consequences.

How it is implemented

For authoritative parents, if the child is a child, perhaps they will still make a schedule of eating and sleeping. However, they will also make adjustments as needed and the best for the child. When the child has entered the age of 3, authoritative parents will set strict rules on health and safety (e.g. no nail biting or throwing toys) and make it happen in a logical way. Examples include keeping a toy from a child if he throws it at Mums.

The impact on children

This type of authoritative foster care pattern is widely regarded as a healthy parenting pattern for the child. According to research, children who are educated with this type of authoritative parenting pattern are generally easy to make friends, cheerful, easy to work with, have a high curiosity, are independent, and have a clear purpose.

3. Attachment

What it means

This type of foster care pattern comes from attachment theory, which believes that the child was born with the need to be nurtured and physically close to the main caretaker (in this case the parent) for several years early in his life. Some experts consider this pattern of foster care part of authoritative parenting patterns, but it is more focused on compassion and physical touch. Both authoritative parenting patterns and loving parenting patterns are responsive to children’s perspectives and both always invite children to discuss.

How it is implemented

This type of foster care pattern is most commonly applied in infancy and childhood, namely the times when the child has a higher need to remain physically close to the main caretaker. One of them is to prioritize the need to breastfeed children, physical contact, and as much as possible reduce separation with the child.

The impact on children

Just like any type of authoritative parenting pattern, this type of foster care pattern can help a child face difficulties and stress, so he is better prepared for life’s challenges. Most experts agree that the pattern of foster care has no significant drawbacks. However, foster care patterns can make it difficult for parents. Taking care of the child every day, meeting the needs of breastfeeding children, and giving a full response every child crying can be exhausting. There is also the risk of Mums and Dads forgetting to take care of themselves.

4. Permissive Parenting Patterns

What it means

This type of permissive foster care pattern is warm, but tends to be loose (or inconsistent) in terms of rules and discipline. Parents with permissive parenting patterns behave more like friends than role models. Thus, the child tends to have a lot of freedom and is not always closely observed. Children who are educated with this type of permissive parenting pattern also tend not to have much responsibility or duty. Their daily life also does not consist of routines that are too fixed.

How it is implemented

An example of permissive attitudes in infants or toddlers is not to set a meal or sleep schedule. When your child has entered the age of 3 years or pre-school age, he is allowed to eat and snack whenever desired without a specific time schedule. Parents with this type of permissive parenting pattern will also not tell their children to clean their toys after they have finished playing. They also do not set a sleep schedule, but rather let the child sleep at any time when they are already sleepy.

The impact on children

Children who grow up with this type of permissive parenting pattern tend to think freely and are not afraid to express what is on their minds. He is not the type of child who is easy to command or told to do activities that are not to their liking. This could mean, the child will have more creativity. However, being educated with an un limitationd parenting pattern also has its drawbacks. Children educated with permissive parenting patterns tend to be more often fussy when they don’t get what they want.

5. Free-range

What it means

This type of free foster care pattern is similar to permissive parenting patterns. Both are flexible and there are not many regulations. The difference is, unlike permissive parenting patterns that tend to let when the child is fussy and angry, parents who follow this type of free foster care pattern are far from teaching the child to be more independent. That is, to let the child do what he thinks he can do, but that does not mean letting him do every thing he wants to do.

How it is implemented

This type of free foster care pattern generally only works in children who are already large, but the concept can be applied to children of any age. For example, such as letting babies and toddlers explore new environments without disturbing or helping them (as long as they are safe). Parents who follow this type of free foster care pattern can allow school-age children to play in the backyard unattended.

The impact on children

Research shows that allowing children to become more independent or independent can form resilience, so that one day children can better overcome challenges and setbacks. This type of free foster care pattern also encourages creativity and problem solving ability. For its drawbacks, not everyone has the same definition of ‘free distance’. Maybe Mums doesn’t mind letting your little one play in the yard unattended, but other people can see it as dangerous.

6. Uninvolved Foster Care Patterns

What it means

The type of foster care pattern not involved cannot meet the emotional or physical needs of the child. Parents who follow this type of parenting pattern do not accept or engage with the child, they also provide little supervision.

How it is implemented

The types of foster care patterns not involved can vary in shape, but are easy to see. For example in infants who do not meet their basic needs, such as food, sleep, and protection. In toddlers with no regard for safety, do not filter what they say when around the child, do not filter the spectacle of the child, let the child be in any environment, or do not care about the child.

The impact on children

Almost all experts agree that this type of parenting pattern does not involved negatively impacting the child. The child needs an emotional connection and when he does not get it from the parents, his nervous system does not work properly. Research shows that children who grow up with unconstended parenting patterns tend to have low self-esteem and difficulty establishing healthy relationships and trusting with others.

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